Category Archives: Ancient Near East

Coins or Scarabs?

As noted in a comment in my last post, Daniel O. McClellan over at his his blog Maklelan, has some possible pictures of the so-called “coins” that were discovered. If he is correct in his opinion and if his pictures … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Egypt, Ancient Near East, Discoveries, Genesis | 2 Comments

Coins from the Joseph Era found In Egypt!?

News reports are buzing this morning about a cache of coins discovered among some unsorted artifacts in the recesses of the Museum of Egypt. Not only are coins not thought to have been used in ancient Egypt, more surprisingly, the … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Egypt, Ancient Near East, Archaeology, Discoveries, Genesis, Joseph, News | 7 Comments

Mesopotamian Cosmic Geography

I want to put a plug in for a book that I ordered for our library when I was doing my “Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia” series last spring, but I have just had a chance to look at it now … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Near East, Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia | 3 Comments

Exiled Gods in the ANE and the Bible

The “Concept of Exile in Ancient Israel and its Contexts” workshop was held two weeks ago at the University of Alberta. Due to teaching and administrative responsibilities, I wasn’t able to attend much of the workshop, though I was able … Continue reading

Posted in Academic Associations, Ancient Near East, Left Behind, Old Testament | 5 Comments

Beware of White Cats!

If you think I meant black cats in the title, you’re wrong. While popular Western culture has vilified black cats as evil omens associated with witchcraft, this is not the case in all societies. I was reading some omen texts … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Near East, Halloween, Holidays | 2 Comments

Theogony, Cosmogony, and Anthropology in ANE Creation Accounts (Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia, Part 4)

This is the fourth and (probably) final post in the series “Ideas of Origins and Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia.â€? The first post in the series detailed some methodological issues and highlighted some bibliographical resources. The second and third posts surveyed … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Near East, Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia, Genesis, Series | Comments Off on Theogony, Cosmogony, and Anthropology in ANE Creation Accounts (Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia, Part 4)

Ancient Egyptian Semitic Snake Spells (or “Snakes in a Pyramid”)

“Ancient Egyptian Semitic Snake Spells” — say that five times fast! As I am getting caught up on some blogging, Shawn Flynn had brought to my attention an interesting article about some semitic spells found on the walls of the … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Egypt, Ancient Near East, Archaeology, Discoveries, Hebrew | 1 Comment

Neo-Babylonian Creation Texts (Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia, Part 3)

This is the third post in the series “Ideas of Origins and Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia.â€? The first post in the series detailed some methodological issues and highlighted some bibliographical resources, while the second post surveyed creation texts from the … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Near East, Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia, Origins and Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia, Series | 3 Comments

Old Babylonian Creation Texts (Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia, Part 2)

This is the second post in the series “Ideas of Origins and Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia.” The first post in the series, which detailed some methodological issues highlighted some bibliographical resources, may be found here. The third post will survey … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Near East, Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia, Genesis, Old Testament, Series | 1 Comment

Ideas of Origins and Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia, Part 1

Next to a close reading of the biblical text, one of the most important steps in its interpretation is knowledge of the ancient cultural and literary context of the Bible. For proper interpretation, we need to know a text’s genre. … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Near East, Creation, Creation in Ancient Mesopotamia, Series | 8 Comments