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The Jesus Tomb on the Today Show

26th February 2007

James Cameron and Simcha Jacobovici were on the Today Show this morning promoting their upcoming documentary, The Lost Tomb of Jesus. There wasn’t much new revealed, though Cameron’s comment is fair enough: “I think people have their specific agendas and their specific kind of knee-jerk reactions, but I think when they see the film and they see how the evidence is presented, then they should comment.” Of course, they love the hype and the controversy, since it is free publicity for their documentary!

Either way, we’ll have to wait until March to comment on the documentary, though the companion book, The Jesus Family Tomb: The Discovery, the Investigation, and the Evidence That Could Change History (HarperCollins, February 2007; Buy from Amazon.ca | Buy from Amazon.com), was released today.

The Today Show website has an article on the interview as well as a video of the interview and a book excerpt. There is also a feature article in Newsweek: Raiders of the lost tomb.


4 Responses to “The Jesus Tomb on the Today Show”

  1. karen Says:

    Be sure to check out the official website at jesusfamilytomb.com.

  2. Vanessa Says:

    Just can’t stop this machine from making money! It is real speicial that authors of this information decided to release this during the “Christian Lent” and coming holy season. The faithfull whom have experiecne the supernatural love of Jesus Christ will never be changed by the soulessness of science.

  3. Abigail Says:

    Actually, I think the official site for the movie (www.jesusfamilytomb.com) shows that there is some real historical relevance to these findings. And I don’t think that it is intended to be disrespectful at all, nor do I think it refutes the theological signifance of Jesus, or events like the resurrection or ascension. The site refers to top notch DNA evidence, and there is a whole panel of experts who have weighed in on the issue to confirm the finding. I was really impressed by this site as a whole, and I really think it’s worth checking out before taking a stance on the issue.

  4. Dan Says:

    This Directors Cut version of the Discovery Channel Special is one of the finest documentaries I have ever had the chance to watch. Not only does it perform as a content-laden doc, but from a production stand-point, in my opinion, it is a spectacular watch from start to finish, for it feels like a feature film during the viewing, a mystery of the highest caliber as the story develops and unfolds. I sat riveted during the entire experience.

    At the root of the story-line is the 1980 uncovering of an underground tomb, found during a construction project in Jerusalem following the bulldozing of an area by developers planning the building of an apartment complex. Two children entered through an entrance-way emblazoned with a ancient chevron and found the extensive, built-out site that contained 10 limestone ossuaries (coffins). Of the ten, 6 had hand-written inscriptions.

    The discovery of the tomb in and of itself was not that uncommon. Others had been discovered, so the Israeli authorities were contacted as would be expected. The contents of the tomb were cataloged and brought to a storage facility.

    What took place 25 years later lays the groundwork for the film, for upon further inspection of the inscriptions, it came to light that the 6 readable names all related to members of Jesus’ family, something that originally was not put together.

    As the Director lets the story unfold, the claims themselves are presented as a mystery. Recreations are mixed with expert interviews and scientific corroboration i.e. DNA testing of scrapings from the ossuaries. The filmmaking itself makes use of current technology on numerous fronts including the use of robotic cameras to first enter the tombs (which had been resealed after the contents had been removed).

    Adding to all of this is Director Simcha Jocabovici’s persona, one that can be compared to an archaeologist on a phenomenal hunt and journey. His personal excitement really adds an incredible dimension to the production. I am not convinced that another Director could have pulled this off with such verve.

    Forgetting for a moment the religious ramifications that this film poses, the viewing experience alone is of incredible value on a human-interest level. Adding in the film’s claims that have not only a religious bend to them, but also a major historical discovery angle for all people, the film becomes one that certainly leads to, if nothing else, a debate of the highest order. Jocabovici, an expert filmmaker for sure, has produced a program that is riveting to watch, enlightening to experience and historical to digest.

    I recommend this film for all to see.